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Volcanic Secrets in the Pacific Ocean

The Pacific Ocean is one of the major parts of our planet and our environment. The Earth is comprised of approximately 71% water that is stretched among oceans, lakes and rivers. The Pacific Ocean in particular is an incredible size that makes up at least 50% of the world’s water. With a span of 69.4 million square miles, it seems to be an endless source of exploration. A recent finding underneath that ocean has stunned the geological world. It is a well-known fact that there are hundreds of volcanoes located in the Pacific Ocean. This approximate number does not include the hundreds that have formed on the surface.

The Volcanic Ring of Fire

The famous Ring of Fire is also known as the Circum-Pacific Belt. It is a scene of volcanic activity that borders along the Pacific. With eruptions come the highest of probabilities an earthquake will occur. The horseshoe shaped path begins at the very bottom of South America and runs along North America, the Bering Strait, Japan, the Philippines, New Zealand and Antarctica with several other locales in between. Due to the movement of tectonic plates, the shifting and continual movement spurs activity. This same ring has a record of holding the most active volcanos around the globe.

Pacific Volcanos

The Ring of Fire is not the only complex of volcanos in the Pacific Ocean. There are several other locations outside of the ring that has their fair share of volcanic activities. Many masses and formations are found deep under the ocean. We are still compiling information as we continue to investigate. One of the secrets of the Pacific was uncovered in recent years. A series of formations were always thought to be numerous distinct Volcanos in the Pacific basin. This theory was disproven across a series of tests and calculations.

Pacific Volcanos
Pacific Volcanos

It was found the Tamu Massif Volcano was indeed one singular unit. The measurements are astonishing with a dome exceeding 100,000 square miles. It has been dated back to prehistoric times giving it an age of approximately 145 million years. The Tamu Massif is fifty times bigger than the previously known largest Volcano on Earth called the Mauna Loa in Hawaii. There is some doubts that could the newly crowned discovery is the biggest in our entire solar system. The Olympus mons on Mars is taller whereas the Tamu Massif is wider. In either case, the Volcano is a treasure of historic value that could change the future. With knowledge of plateaus, plates and Volcanos, Geological and Scientific departments gain invaluable knowledge of our surroundings.

In the Pacific

We are always moving forward in our world. Advancements are just one part of what we have learned from the past coupled with modern techniques. The Pacific Ocean has a depth of information that offer us millions of years to discover. These insights will guide us across the earth while offering a path to better understand the mysterious elements of our universe.

In the Pacific
In the Pacific
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